On Quitting

It took over 100 ‘No’s before someone told me Yes.

It took over 500 blog posts before I changed my thought process.

It took me over 700 days to end a relationship.

Some might say I am a slow learner.

Perhaps.

Id argue differently. Im not notoriously a slow thinker yet I strive to be like one.

There are benefits to thinking slow:

– Creating a well designed plan.

– Calculating risk.

– Physically writing down the advantages and disadvantages regarding a situation.

– Sleeping on an email before sending it.

It took Tim Ferriss 28 publisher rejections prior to being told Yes to the NYT best seller The 4 Hour Workweek. And thats after he did the work of writing it.

Shackleton’s men endured over 500 days escaping an icy death. That was after they decided to take the voyage.

It took Derek Sivers a decade of experience before he could write Anything You Want.

A team of people failed countless times before creating a working light bulb.

Sinek will ask you to Start With Why.

Seth will ask, Whats it for?

And Carse will point out playing for the long game is about playing to play, not playing to win.

Deciding to end or start something both have one commonality. You must decide. And then go do that thing.

Thanks for reading,

Cory

Doggo (A Short Story)

Doggo waited, perched in her backyard.

She reviewed today’s to-do list:

  • Investigate Sniffy Spots
  • Hide bone
  • Chew shoes
  • Slobber on mail
  • Snooze
  • Eat pizza with family during Pizza Movie Night

Pizza Movie Night was something everyone in the house looked forward to each week.

This week will be different, Doggo thought.

Tail wagging like a metronome, she hopped up on the wagon, peering into the window.

She howled to alert the family about her decision.

Doggo drooled at the thought of pizza.

Cheese pizza.

Pizza with sausage. 

Day-old pizza. 

Oh, and pizza bones. Those are perhaps the best.

She floated to cloud nine.

Tonight will be magical, she thought.

The back door opened. Come on back in Doggo, said the girl. We saved you a seat right in the middle.

Her little heart went pitter-patter, tail wagging faster.

What a night!

End

Write

When you are happy, Write.

When you are sad, Write.

When you are feeling confident, Write some more.

When you are unsure and stuck, Write Again.

Keep Writing and then Write some more.

Reflect on what you Wrote.

No one ever has to see it.

If you do share, do so generously.

And Write again in the morning.

Keep on Truckin’

Love, Your Future Self

The Snake Next To The TypeWriter

My mind wanders as I think about about Stephen Pressfield’s book The War of Art, which describes the inner battle the writer struggles with in their creative pursuits.

I look over to where my laptop lays and to my surprise I find an anaconda, seven and half feet in length with a circumference of thirteen inches, just sitting there with her mean yellow eyes looking deeply into my soul. The green scales coiling slowly. Asystole. My heart flatlines. Poof. This is how it ends, I think.

This is the scene I imagine at the thought of sitting down to type.

But as I ignore my lizard brain the fog clears and the sun comes up. I start to type and then the words start to pour. The sunbeams shine brighter, flower petals open; even the succulents seem happier.

This is the definition of winning I think. I look next to me and see a quote by Aldous Huxley

Do what you should do when you should do it, whether you feel like it or not.

And another,

We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence then is not an act, it is a habit.

These kind words fill my soul, motivating me to seize the day.

And then I realize, I just did.