Plan de Vida

In South America, plan de vida is similar to the term vocation.

Vocation is the intense feeling of suitability for your career or occupation.

It is the reason why you do what you do.

In Japan, it is also called ikigai. 

I was thinking about these terms this morning as I read Shawn Askinosie’s book Meaningful Work and his reference to Tuesdays with Morrie by Mitch Albom. It got me thinking more about what I am currently doing, what I’ve done and what I am planning to do.

What truly drives you?

This conversation in my head, now written in this blog, starts with an excerpt from Tuesdays With Morrie.

Devote yourself to loving others, devote yourself to your community around you, and devote yourself to creating something that gives you purpose and meaning.

“You’ll notice,” he added, grinning, “there’s nothing in there about a salary.”

“Do the kinds of things that come from the heart. When you do, you won’t be dissatisfied, you won’t be envious, you won’t belonging for somebody else’s things. On the contrary, you’ll be overwhelmed with what comes back.”

Tuesdays With Morrie – Mitch Albom

Helping others drives me.

To actually propel someone forward, to leave them slightly better than you found them, and to make a small dent in the universe requires showing up daily with generous intent.

This will look different depending on who you are.

Making a dent in the universe doesn’t mean saving the world from the next pandemic. It doesn’t involve curing cancer. And it doesn’t necessarily mean holding the door open for the person behind you.

Helping others is really about an attitude and approach towards life.

It shifts the focus from me to you. 

Metaphorically, it requires stepping out of one’s shoes and swapping with your neighbor. It also doesn’t mean you must keep your neighbor’s shoes. It is more about understanding where the other person is coming from.

And this involves listening deeply. And not waiting to speak when the other person is speaking.

It is about being heard and being seen.

Parents who are actively involved with their kids know this. When you have a kid, you stop looking at the ground in front of you. You shift your eyes to the horizon. You pick your kid up higher above your shoulders so they too can see the view ahead.

Plan de vida, ikigai and vocation.

Whatever you choose to do, whether that be a project, career, or even lifestyle, do so with intent and tact. Think about how you will end or transition the project before you even start it.

That’s all for today.

Thanks for reading,

Cory.

Doggo (A Short Story)

Doggo waited, perched in her backyard.

She reviewed today’s to-do list:

  • Investigate Sniffy Spots
  • Hide bone
  • Chew shoes
  • Slobber on mail
  • Snooze
  • Eat pizza with family during Pizza Movie Night

Pizza Movie Night was something everyone in the house looked forward to each week.

This week will be different, Doggo thought.

Tail wagging like a metronome, she hopped up on the wagon, peering into the window.

She howled to alert the family about her decision.

Doggo drooled at the thought of pizza.

Cheese pizza.

Pizza with sausage. 

Day-old pizza. 

Oh, and pizza bones. Those are perhaps the best.

She floated to cloud nine.

Tonight will be magical, she thought.

The back door opened. Come on back in Doggo, said the girl. We saved you a seat right in the middle.

Her little heart went pitter-patter, tail wagging faster.

What a night!

End

The Day I Took Cheese On A Walk

I woke up and saw the outside world was beautiful.

What a pleasant day for a walk, I thought.

I did not have a pet dog, fish, or bunny. The next best option was Cheese.

I brushed my teeth, tied my shoes, and removed Cheese from the fridge.

I cut a nice chunk and put it in my pocket.

I phoned the school, impersonated mom.

“My daughter won’t be in; she’s home sick.”

They said, “Ok.”

Cheese and I took a step out the door to adventure.

We went all over creation. We walked past the school.

We walked past the library. We even walked past the disco.

We walked all the way down to the river to have a seat.

I pulled Cheese out of my pocket.

It had taken another shape.

Someone walked by.

“Can you take our picture?”

They looked at me puzzled, eyebrows slightly raised. “Smile,” they said.

“Cheese!”

“Thank you,” I said and continued down the riverwalk.

Cheese and I picked a handful of flowers and journeyed on.

We marched back up the hill to home, Cheese and flowers in my pocket.

When mom washed clothes, her eyebrows slightly raised, puzzled.

The inside world was beautiful.

I went to bed.

Inspired by Shel Silverstein; Based on Real Life Events.

Cory

Camping 2.0

… and off they went biking along the single track…

The girls had ridden their bicycles all day. They just completed an eighteen-mile out n’ back trail named Sourdough, up along Indian Creek Wilderness, a bit north of Nederland, Colorado.

What a day! she exclaimed; I’m starving.

I could eat at least three burgers, her sister replied. What do we have for food?

Marshmallows. I believe that’s all we packed. 

Well, that puts us in a pickle, said her sister.

Just kidding, Dad shipped us out with a true spread: burgers, fixings, and even chocolate cake. All we have to do is fire up the grill. 

After dinner, the sun dipped and glowed a radiant starburst orange behind the Rockies. The wind whispered gently through the trees, and the birds and bugs chattered softly.

The girls put together a small campfire to warm their toes and snuggled up right next to each other in their camp chairs, teddy bears included.

They had brought a mix of books with them in the truck to start the evening. 

To her surprise, she had found an old-looking book squeezed between some of their favorites. Look at this, she told her sister, one of dad’s booksHe must have sent it along with us…

… to be continued… 

Thanks for reading, 

Cory

4 Steps to Talk STIs with Your Kid

*This article is purely information and meant to add to your PCP recs and visit*

As a parent and soon-to-be Family Nurse Practitioner, I frequently wonder how I will handle the Sexually Transmitted Infection (previously STD) conversation with my kids.


Every parent is different and true to form, every kid is develops in their own time. The dynamics between your relationship with your kid(s) is much different from mine.

Regardless, here is a four step approach I would take to have an STI conversation with your kid:

  1. Be honest and open

Kids want to know about this kind of stuff. If you don’t start the conversation, they will and it may not be with you. Many kids look to their peer group and online as a source of information. As you could probably imagine, most of the information they will find will not be up to par. This is why it is vital for you, as the parent, to kickstart the conversation.

The best time to bring up a conversation about symptoms of Candida vulvovaginitis may not be when you are eating cottage cheese for breakfast (or it might depending upon your parenting style). In our house, many conversations do spring up during family mealtimes. The mealtime prep arena is a great way to find out about what is going in your kid’s life, what they are up to and who they hang with. 

If you don’t know, ask. And if you’re not sure, look it up from a reputable source like CDC, WHO, or MayoClinic. Ask your Primary Care Provider. Let’s say your kid asks a question you have no idea how to respond to. Try saying, “Great question, let’s look it up together.” By you saying this phrase, it shows your kid that you are transparent, a lifelong learner and shows them where and how to find information. A side effect is that your kid will be the one spinning reputable information to his or her friends.

I would use the following sites:

2. Listen, Ask Questions

As a parent, you want to keep a cool collected approach. This involves being genuinely interested in what your kid has to say and not freaking out and panicking if the sex/disease conversation springs up starting with them.

3. Encourage the HPV Vaccine

Many parents fear that encouraging kids to get this shot will encourage them to start having sex. For those of you who like data, it actually doesn’t.

Of all the vaccines, the Human Papillomavirus Vaccine is the only vaccine that can prevent six types of cancer (males and females). It is a two to three-shot series typically offered to kids starting ages nine and typically 11 – 14 up to age 26. (For the nitty-gritty, the 9-valent HPV vaccine protects against HPV types 6, 11, 16, 18, 31, 33, 45, 50, and 58.) And of course, there are always special circumstances to receiving this vaccine, so best to talk with your PCP.

4. Whoops

So say you found this article way too late. Your child is currently having sex, has or has had an STI. What do you do now? (see bullet 5)

Are they currently feeling sickly? Unless life-threatening (go to the ED), visit your PCP for treatment. Expect to pay for something along the lines of a z-pack and some doxy for a GC-type workup.

4.5 A Note on Birth Control: Males and females: many offices offer free condoms. Better to prevent than to react. For females, a popular option is an implant.

5. Keep the conversation going

Keeping the door open for continued conversation is key. An introduction to STIs during breakfast may get shut down quick with a gross factor yet it is important. Providing an open door and allowing your kid to come to you when he or she is ready promotes trust and safety.

End

Did you find this useful? Share with a friend.

Thanks for reading.

Cory

Photo Credit GiantMicrobes.com