What is HB21-1256?

Originally published on Colorado ENA Government Affairs Blog

Thanks to Susan Lontine, Faith Winter, and Cleave Simpson HB21-1256, Delivering Healthcare Through Telemedicine became law 5/11/2021.


HB21-1256 states that in-person contact between a health care provider (medical or mental health) and the patient is not required. The bill also promotes funding for and lays the groundwork for rules and policies regarding the structure and future of telemedicine (how it is billed, its relationship with insurance, etc.).


What does this mean?


As a patient, you can now officially contact and receive health care services without having an in-person visit for treatment that does not require an in-person visit. This is not new, but it is now formalized. If your provider needs to physically assess you (look in your ears, listen to your lungs, draw blood), you still need to go in person. This bill is a win for mental health services as many times, the provider simply needs to lay ideas on you and have a conversation. 


As a provider, several changes are at play. More rules are coming your way regarding billing and insurance. This is not necessarily a bad thing. The way billing for ICD-10 and CPT codes will expand, allowing you to appropriately charge for your time with your patients; You may be able to work from home and eliminate your commute; your ability to reach a larger network of patients may expand, providing you the ability to increase access to care to the underserved and rural communities. 


What’s the big deal? 


Although the increase in Zoom calls, and remote business meetings have exponentially increased over the last 18 months, telemedicine itself is not a new conversation. The benefits of utilizing remote healthcare services and its impact on reducing health care costs have been well documented. This bill is a big deal because it formalizes the process, thereby laying the groundwork for future innovation. As research continues, many changes in telemedicine will continue to occur, which will ultimately increase access to care, improving public health in the U.S. 
Thanks for reading. 


Cory Peticolas RN BSN CEN. 


For more Colorado ENA updates, follow along @ https://coenagovernmentaffairs.wordpress.com/

brain shock

Another Netflix episode? Or an hour spent journaling.

Another ten minutes on Instagram? Or time spent doing nothing.

No phone. No input. Simply being. 

Many have written about the power of turning off and physically removing sources of input (i.e., the cellphone).

It is a phenomenal brain charge and a healthy thing to do regularly.

In the material world, when wondering whether to keep or give away a sweater, Marie Kondo asks Does this bring joy?

The same question applies to media and the internet.

Disconnecting creates brain space.

The empty space allows for stillness which counterintuitively floods the brain with creativity.

The effect is similar to taking a cold shower.

Turning on airplane mode and hiding the phone creates space for eureka moments.

4 Steps to Talk STIs with Your Kid

*This article is purely information and meant to add to your PCP recs and visit*

As a parent and soon-to-be Family Nurse Practitioner, I frequently wonder how I will handle the Sexually Transmitted Infection (previously STD) conversation with my kids.


Every parent is different and true to form, every kid is develops in their own time. The dynamics between your relationship with your kid(s) is much different from mine.

Regardless, here is a four step approach I would take to have an STI conversation with your kid:

  1. Be honest and open

Kids want to know about this kind of stuff. If you don’t start the conversation, they will and it may not be with you. Many kids look to their peer group and online as a source of information. As you could probably imagine, most of the information they will find will not be up to par. This is why it is vital for you, as the parent, to kickstart the conversation.

The best time to bring up a conversation about symptoms of Candida vulvovaginitis may not be when you are eating cottage cheese for breakfast (or it might depending upon your parenting style). In our house, many conversations do spring up during family mealtimes. The mealtime prep arena is a great way to find out about what is going in your kid’s life, what they are up to and who they hang with. 

If you don’t know, ask. And if you’re not sure, look it up from a reputable source like CDC, WHO, or MayoClinic. Ask your Primary Care Provider. Let’s say your kid asks a question you have no idea how to respond to. Try saying, “Great question, let’s look it up together.” By you saying this phrase, it shows your kid that you are transparent, a lifelong learner and shows them where and how to find information. A side effect is that your kid will be the one spinning reputable information to his or her friends.

I would use the following sites:

2. Listen, Ask Questions

As a parent, you want to keep a cool collected approach. This involves being genuinely interested in what your kid has to say and not freaking out and panicking if the sex/disease conversation springs up starting with them.

3. Encourage the HPV Vaccine

Many parents fear that encouraging kids to get this shot will encourage them to start having sex. For those of you who like data, it actually doesn’t.

Of all the vaccines, the Human Papillomavirus Vaccine is the only vaccine that can prevent six types of cancer (males and females). It is a two to three-shot series typically offered to kids starting ages nine and typically 11 – 14 up to age 26. (For the nitty-gritty, the 9-valent HPV vaccine protects against HPV types 6, 11, 16, 18, 31, 33, 45, 50, and 58.) And of course, there are always special circumstances to receiving this vaccine, so best to talk with your PCP.

4. Whoops

So say you found this article way too late. Your child is currently having sex, has or has had an STI. What do you do now? (see bullet 5)

Are they currently feeling sickly? Unless life-threatening (go to the ED), visit your PCP for treatment. Expect to pay for something along the lines of a z-pack and some doxy for a GC-type workup.

4.5 A Note on Birth Control: Males and females: many offices offer free condoms. Better to prevent than to react. For females, a popular option is an implant.

5. Keep the conversation going

Keeping the door open for continued conversation is key. An introduction to STIs during breakfast may get shut down quick with a gross factor yet it is important. Providing an open door and allowing your kid to come to you when he or she is ready promotes trust and safety.

End

Did you find this useful? Share with a friend.

Thanks for reading.

Cory

Photo Credit GiantMicrobes.com