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What is HB21-1256?

Originally published on Colorado ENA Government Affairs Blog

Thanks to Susan Lontine, Faith Winter, and Cleave Simpson HB21-1256, Delivering Healthcare Through Telemedicine became law 5/11/2021.


HB21-1256 states that in-person contact between a health care provider (medical or mental health) and the patient is not required. The bill also promotes funding for and lays the groundwork for rules and policies regarding the structure and future of telemedicine (how it is billed, its relationship with insurance, etc.).


What does this mean?


As a patient, you can now officially contact and receive health care services without having an in-person visit for treatment that does not require an in-person visit. This is not new, but it is now formalized. If your provider needs to physically assess you (look in your ears, listen to your lungs, draw blood), you still need to go in person. This bill is a win for mental health services as many times, the provider simply needs to lay ideas on you and have a conversation. 


As a provider, several changes are at play. More rules are coming your way regarding billing and insurance. This is not necessarily a bad thing. The way billing for ICD-10 and CPT codes will expand, allowing you to appropriately charge for your time with your patients; You may be able to work from home and eliminate your commute; your ability to reach a larger network of patients may expand, providing you the ability to increase access to care to the underserved and rural communities. 


What’s the big deal? 


Although the increase in Zoom calls, and remote business meetings have exponentially increased over the last 18 months, telemedicine itself is not a new conversation. The benefits of utilizing remote healthcare services and its impact on reducing health care costs have been well documented. This bill is a big deal because it formalizes the process, thereby laying the groundwork for future innovation. As research continues, many changes in telemedicine will continue to occur, which will ultimately increase access to care, improving public health in the U.S. 
Thanks for reading. 


Cory Peticolas RN BSN CEN. 


For more Colorado ENA updates, follow along @ https://coenagovernmentaffairs.wordpress.com/

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brain shock

Another Netflix episode? Or an hour spent journaling.

Another ten minutes on Instagram? Or time spent doing nothing.

No phone. No input. Simply being. 

Many have written about the power of turning off and physically removing sources of input (i.e., the cellphone).

It is a phenomenal brain charge and a healthy thing to do regularly.

In the material world, when wondering whether to keep or give away a sweater, Marie Kondo asks Does this bring joy?

The same question applies to media and the internet.

Disconnecting creates brain space.

The empty space allows for stillness which counterintuitively floods the brain with creativity.

The effect is similar to taking a cold shower.

Turning on airplane mode and hiding the phone creates space for eureka moments.

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Plan de Vida

In South America, plan de vida is similar to the term vocation.

Vocation is the intense feeling of suitability for your career or occupation.

It is the reason why you do what you do.

In Japan, it is also called ikigai. 

I was thinking about these terms this morning as I read Shawn Askinosie’s book Meaningful Work and his reference to Tuesdays with Morrie by Mitch Albom. It got me thinking more about what I am currently doing, what I’ve done and what I am planning to do.

What truly drives you?

This conversation in my head, now written in this blog, starts with an excerpt from Tuesdays With Morrie.

Devote yourself to loving others, devote yourself to your community around you, and devote yourself to creating something that gives you purpose and meaning.

“You’ll notice,” he added, grinning, “there’s nothing in there about a salary.”

“Do the kinds of things that come from the heart. When you do, you won’t be dissatisfied, you won’t be envious, you won’t belonging for somebody else’s things. On the contrary, you’ll be overwhelmed with what comes back.”

Tuesdays With Morrie – Mitch Albom

Helping others drives me.

To actually propel someone forward, to leave them slightly better than you found them, and to make a small dent in the universe requires showing up daily with generous intent.

This will look different depending on who you are.

Making a dent in the universe doesn’t mean saving the world from the next pandemic. It doesn’t involve curing cancer. And it doesn’t necessarily mean holding the door open for the person behind you.

Helping others is really about an attitude and approach towards life.

It shifts the focus from me to you. 

Metaphorically, it requires stepping out of one’s shoes and swapping with your neighbor. It also doesn’t mean you must keep your neighbor’s shoes. It is more about understanding where the other person is coming from.

And this involves listening deeply. And not waiting to speak when the other person is speaking.

It is about being heard and being seen.

Parents who are actively involved with their kids know this. When you have a kid, you stop looking at the ground in front of you. You shift your eyes to the horizon. You pick your kid up higher above your shoulders so they too can see the view ahead.

Plan de vida, ikigai and vocation.

Whatever you choose to do, whether that be a project, career, or even lifestyle, do so with intent and tact. Think about how you will end or transition the project before you even start it.

That’s all for today.

Thanks for reading,

Cory.

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The day I quit the cube farm and became a Fromager

It was my first day in the cube farm.

And it did not last long.

I took one look and thought to myself, I will not last one minute.

I thought of A Walk in the Woods by Bill Bryson and Walden by Thoreau.

I thought of scenes from Office Space and Fight Club. Further, I visualized myself melting into a puddle of wax like a candle out of an Indiana Jones movie.

And then I had an epiphany.

I could change my life trajectory in a flash.

I could seize the entrepreneurship lifestyle so many adore and talk about.

It was a wizard-like stroke of insight.

I could become a Fromager, an expert who makes cheese.

https://www.instructables.com/Basic-Steps-of-How-to-Make-Cheese/

What indeed could be better than such an escape?

Visions of sharp, soft, and gooey cheese melted into my brain.

The much sought-after lifestyle of the fromager had never previously crossed my mind.

Oh, mild-cheddar bliss!

The cheese caves. The dark must funk of the fascinating cheese universe. I could not resist the idea.

I promptly walked into my new boss’s office and told him Goodbye.

He could see the sparkle in my eye, his eyebrow slightly raised.

The alarm buzzed.

Startled, I half opened an eye and then realized it was Monday.

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Happiness is Climbing

What is the best part about climbing?

Photo by Brook Anderson on Unsplash

Is it the planning?

Is it poring over maps the night before a trip?

Is it organizing the gear? Is it packing the truck?

Is it making snacks and sandwiches?

Is it cajoling the kids to get dressed and in the car?

Is it the adventure drive to the climbing spot?

Is it unpacking the car and reloading gear?

Is it the approach?

Is it getting lost with the guidebook you didn’t bring?

Is it the moment when you realize, in fact, you are in the right spot?

Is it that good climbing smell as you open your bag?

Is it the warm sunshine as you harness up?

Is it that first touch of rock?

Is it going up?

Is it yelling, “Take the rope!“?

Is it a lead fall?

Is it dangling in space?

Is it the required focused attention?

Is it the zen-like state you enter?

Is it the smiles? Laughter? Being with good friends?

Is it the view from the top?

Is it the shared experience of joy?

Is it the bite of dried sandwich? Or the coolness of your bubbling beverage?

Is it the rappel down?

Is it the trek back to the truck? Or the return trip home?

Is it that lovely fatigued feeling of adventure?

Perhaps the best part about climbing in fact is all of the above.

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All the action happens at 32 degrees.

Focus on systems, not goals. 

Since 2012, when I took a travel writing course, I wanted to write a book. This was my goal.

It is now 2021. The book hasn’t happened. I have pitched this goal. Instead, I made a system.

Why now?

I got so sick of myself not writing. It was too big of a goal to write a book and I felt paralyzed.

Like wanting eight pack abs, one goal for me was to show up and write. This goal wasn’t working. I didn’t have a well-designed system in place. I atrophied.

James Clear, the best-selling author of Atomic Habits, says that massive change occurs over time in small increments.

He tells the story of an ice cube sitting in a warming room.

At 25 degrees, ice is ice. Nothing exciting happens.

At 26 degrees, ice is still ice, yet at the molecular level, things are changing.

At 27 degrees, same story.

At 32 degrees, BOOM! Now we have water.

No one can see the small molecular changes happening in those 7 degrees of change. To the outside observer, it is as if all the change happens instantly.

Goals are about the results you want to achieve. Systems are about the processes that lead to those results.

James Clear, Atomic Habits

Now I have a system in place. 

It took me a long time with other projects (photography, healthcare drug waste, comic strip, a children’s plush animal for a book) and sunk costs to realize what was and wasn’t working. And that is okay. Those previous experiences are all part of the building process.

I am writing.

The more pride you have in a particular aspect of your identity, the more motivated you will be to maintain the habits associated with it.

James Clear, Atomic Habits

It is motivating for me to look back and connect the dots. It is more exciting to imagine and plan for a brighter future. It starts now. When asked, “Are you a writer?” What do you say?

Thanks for reading,

Cory

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Wrenching Season

Photo by Tekton on Unsplash

It is that time of year to take the cover off the bike, refresh the fluids, invest in new tires, find that 10mm wrench, and get to work.

There is a thing about wrenching that is very grounding. The physical turn of the wrench, the removal of bolts, schlepping of metal, and replacing gaskets and seals provide endorphins where I find myself returning to it again and again.

Regardless of the project, the wrenching process itself can be illuminating. With the proper diagnostic mindset, you end up finding out more about yourself in the process. The blood, sweat, and profanity of a pinched finger are essential elements.

“The real cycle you’re working on is a cycle called yourself.”

Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance

Similar to wrenching your machine for improvement, journaling sharpens the mind. It is the process of self-reflection through writing. Similar to fresh oil in a machine, journaling helps clear the mind, improving arterial flow to the brain. The habit of wrenching your mind daily with pencil and paper provides profound creative bursts of insight. At the end of the wrenching session, you may feel as if you have solved all of the world’s problems.

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Doggo (A Short Story)

Doggo waited, perched in her backyard.

She reviewed today’s to-do list:

  • Investigate Sniffy Spots
  • Hide bone
  • Chew shoes
  • Slobber on mail
  • Snooze
  • Eat pizza with family during Pizza Movie Night

Pizza Movie Night was something everyone in the house looked forward to each week.

This week will be different, Doggo thought.

Tail wagging like a metronome, she hopped up on the wagon, peering into the window.

She howled to alert the family about her decision.

Doggo drooled at the thought of pizza.

Cheese pizza.

Pizza with sausage. 

Day-old pizza. 

Oh, and pizza bones. Those are perhaps the best.

She floated to cloud nine.

Tonight will be magical, she thought.

The back door opened. Come on back in Doggo, said the girl. We saved you a seat right in the middle.

Her little heart went pitter-patter, tail wagging faster.

What a night!

End

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Write

When you are happy, Write.

When you are sad, Write.

When you are feeling confident, Write some more.

When you are unsure and stuck, Write Again.

Keep Writing and then Write some more.

Reflect on what you Wrote.

No one ever has to see it.

If you do share, do so generously.

And Write again in the morning.

Keep on Truckin’

Love, Your Future Self

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The Day I Took Cheese On A Walk

I woke up and saw the outside world was beautiful.

What a pleasant day for a walk, I thought.

I did not have a pet dog, fish, or bunny. The next best option was Cheese.

I brushed my teeth, tied my shoes, and removed Cheese from the fridge.

I cut a nice chunk and put it in my pocket.

I phoned the school, impersonated mom.

“My daughter won’t be in; she’s home sick.”

They said, “Ok.”

Cheese and I took a step out the door to adventure.

We went all over creation. We walked past the school.

We walked past the library. We even walked past the disco.

We walked all the way down to the river to have a seat.

I pulled Cheese out of my pocket.

It had taken another shape.

Someone walked by.

“Can you take our picture?”

They looked at me puzzled, eyebrows slightly raised. “Smile,” they said.

“Cheese!”

“Thank you,” I said and continued down the riverwalk.

Cheese and I picked a handful of flowers and journeyed on.

We marched back up the hill to home, Cheese and flowers in my pocket.

When mom washed clothes, her eyebrows slightly raised, puzzled.

The inside world was beautiful.

I went to bed.

Inspired by Shel Silverstein; Based on Real Life Events.

Cory

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Camping 2.0

… and off they went biking along the single track…

The girls had ridden their bicycles all day. They just completed an eighteen-mile out n’ back trail named Sourdough, up along Indian Creek Wilderness, a bit north of Nederland, Colorado.

What a day! she exclaimed; I’m starving.

I could eat at least three burgers, her sister replied. What do we have for food?

Marshmallows. I believe that’s all we packed. 

Well, that puts us in a pickle, said her sister.

Just kidding, Dad shipped us out with a true spread: burgers, fixings, and even chocolate cake. All we have to do is fire up the grill. 

After dinner, the sun dipped and glowed a radiant starburst orange behind the Rockies. The wind whispered gently through the trees, and the birds and bugs chattered softly.

The girls put together a small campfire to warm their toes and snuggled up right next to each other in their camp chairs, teddy bears included.

They had brought a mix of books with them in the truck to start the evening. 

To her surprise, she had found an old-looking book squeezed between some of their favorites. Look at this, she told her sister, one of dad’s booksHe must have sent it along with us…

… to be continued… 

Thanks for reading, 

Cory

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Motorcycle JoyMachine

Sometimes when I wake up, I don’t feel like going to work. The sheets are warm and it is still dark outside. The blackness of sleep engulfs my brain. I think to myself I should really get a work-from-home kind of job. It is Monday afterall. The call from management with someone saying, You know what, take the day off doesn’t ever ring.

Then I remember, I’m riding my motorcycle to work. I literally spring out of bed like an activated mousetrap. I think about skipping the coffee (but I don’t) and I race out the door and ride slow because life is the journey.

Being able to hop on and ride the KLR650 turns the morning slog into an adventure. This one factor changes everything I had previously thought about the day.

The gray fog world transforms as the sun bursts pink and orange. Rising over the trees, shining bright and almost blinding my eyes from the traffic light, I accelerate and smile east into the sun. I have a 360 degree view.

As I shift from second to third, I think, riding to work is far better than driving to work (and safer if everyone did it). You are super aware of your surroundings. Your radar is sharp, defensive driving skills astute. You’re not complacent or distracted. You don’t text and drive. I am always surprised why more people don’t ride. It is okay. Drivers just don’t know how much fun they are missing out on. 

Life is undoubtedly better on a motorcycle. Riding is like being in a secret society. Passing by other riders, you give the friendly low wave, the acknowledgment nod. Cruising by you both know you have the same shared joy.

End

Thanks for reading,

Cory

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4 Steps to Talk STIs with Your Kid

*This article is purely information and meant to add to your PCP recs and visit*

As a parent and soon-to-be Family Nurse Practitioner, I frequently wonder how I will handle the Sexually Transmitted Infection (previously STD) conversation with my kids.


Every parent is different and true to form, every kid is develops in their own time. The dynamics between your relationship with your kid(s) is much different from mine.

Regardless, here is a four step approach I would take to have an STI conversation with your kid:

  1. Be honest and open

Kids want to know about this kind of stuff. If you don’t start the conversation, they will and it may not be with you. Many kids look to their peer group and online as a source of information. As you could probably imagine, most of the information they will find will not be up to par. This is why it is vital for you, as the parent, to kickstart the conversation.

The best time to bring up a conversation about symptoms of Candida vulvovaginitis may not be when you are eating cottage cheese for breakfast (or it might depending upon your parenting style). In our house, many conversations do spring up during family mealtimes. The mealtime prep arena is a great way to find out about what is going in your kid’s life, what they are up to and who they hang with. 

If you don’t know, ask. And if you’re not sure, look it up from a reputable source like CDC, WHO, or MayoClinic. Ask your Primary Care Provider. Let’s say your kid asks a question you have no idea how to respond to. Try saying, “Great question, let’s look it up together.” By you saying this phrase, it shows your kid that you are transparent, a lifelong learner and shows them where and how to find information. A side effect is that your kid will be the one spinning reputable information to his or her friends.

I would use the following sites:

2. Listen, Ask Questions

As a parent, you want to keep a cool collected approach. This involves being genuinely interested in what your kid has to say and not freaking out and panicking if the sex/disease conversation springs up starting with them.

3. Encourage the HPV Vaccine

Many parents fear that encouraging kids to get this shot will encourage them to start having sex. For those of you who like data, it actually doesn’t.

Of all the vaccines, the Human Papillomavirus Vaccine is the only vaccine that can prevent six types of cancer (males and females). It is a two to three-shot series typically offered to kids starting ages nine and typically 11 – 14 up to age 26. (For the nitty-gritty, the 9-valent HPV vaccine protects against HPV types 6, 11, 16, 18, 31, 33, 45, 50, and 58.) And of course, there are always special circumstances to receiving this vaccine, so best to talk with your PCP.

4. Whoops

So say you found this article way too late. Your child is currently having sex, has or has had an STI. What do you do now? (see bullet 5)

Are they currently feeling sickly? Unless life-threatening (go to the ED), visit your PCP for treatment. Expect to pay for something along the lines of a z-pack and some doxy for a GC-type workup.

4.5 A Note on Birth Control: Males and females: many offices offer free condoms. Better to prevent than to react. For females, a popular option is an implant.

5. Keep the conversation going

Keeping the door open for continued conversation is key. An introduction to STIs during breakfast may get shut down quick with a gross factor yet it is important. Providing an open door and allowing your kid to come to you when he or she is ready promotes trust and safety.

End

Did you find this useful? Share with a friend.

Thanks for reading.

Cory

Photo Credit GiantMicrobes.com

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Series of Short Stories 3.0 (for the kids)

CLIMBING

You might have guessed this story was coming based on the last two (Camping & Bicycling). Climbing seemed like a natural progression of going up.

The only thing better than camping and bicycling is going Up with your friends high on your favorite rock, clinging daintily to a cliff, like a spider spun onto a web. You can’t get enough of this kind of stuff.

Climbing brings true joy. It builds mental fierceness and it forces you to focus as you ascend. When you repel, you come down with clarity. A very down-to-earth paramedic I worked with a couple of years ago told me, “If everybody just went out to the mountains and sat on a rock, and thought for a bit and breathed, the world would spin a little bit slower.”

I asked my kids, “Where do you want to go?”

They tell me, “Up. We want to go up!”

And I know what they mean.

Climbing as an adult (and really at any age) is the equivalent of tree climbing when you were a kid. Why on earth did you climb trees when you were little? You may not have known it then, but the real reason was to go Up. Simple as that.

Replying to the question, “Why did you want to climb Mount Everest?” George Mallory famously replied, “Because it’s there.”

I think that sums it up nicely.

Thanks for reading,

Cory

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Series of Short Stories 2.0 (for the kids)

Pedal Faster!

Pedal faster, she screamed in a mixed excited, surprised wail. There’s a giant squid behind us and it’s going to get us!

It was just the motivation dad needed to pull the trailer up the increasing incline. He thought of the lactic acid building in his legs starting to become more of a reality than purely a textbook idea. Dad had not seen the squid but knew it was there. She had seen it. And it was real.

Her sister had not seen the squid either but as she turned her head around, her eyes widened and her mouth dropped. She joined in Dad, Pedal faster! The squid! The squid! It’s going to get us.

Mind racing, feet spinning, dad kicked into high gear for fear of their potential peril with this unknown underwater creature. Shouts of glee paraded from the back of the trailer!

Once they were around the corner past the top of the hill free of the squid, dad downshifted again on the 80s purple Bianchi, slowing a tad to catch his breath. They were almost home and all four of them were nap ready.

The end.

Story Footnotes

We had pedaled all the way to Pirate Island and back, a place about ten miles from our home. The one hundred pound trailer included the kids, the chocolate-colored toy poodle, water, wet wipes and snacks, which decreased due to hungry tummies.

Pirate Island is a magical place. It sits just along the river, shaded by cottonwoods providing a small beach that ebbs depending on the river’s flow. Today, the sand beach was limited due to the snowmelt. The sky remained crystal clear blue with cumulus clouds in the distance.

Riding around in our neighborhood is similar to icing on cake. It is where adventure continues. Adventure doesn’t always have to be hours away or even halfway across the globe. It starts right when you wake up. It is an orientation toward life. It’s about possibility and opportunity. It’s a way of seeing the world from the eyes of a child. The ability to keep this perspective as an adult is what keeps me young. The kids and the weight of the trailer, of course, help.

Biking has everything we need. So, I’ll keep at it and pedal faster.  

As a sidenote, want to know something funny? This is a true story. Including the giant squid.

Thanks for reading.

Cory

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Series of Short Stories 1.0 (for the kids)

CAMPING

The best thing about summer is camping and everything that comes with it, she thought. She thought about the hikes, the orange flowers, sitting on a rock, the puffy clouds, the crisp air, the dark starry nights and of course, single-track mountain biking. High in the mountains with you and our yellow tent is precisely where I want to be, she told her sister.

Well, let’s go, her sister exclaimed! What exactly do we need? she asked.

Two bicycles, a tent, some marshmallows for food, and maybe a snuggly teddy bear or two for nighttime, she said. I think that’s about it.

And off they went.

When they arrived high in the mountains, the girls pitched their tent between three big trees. It was a perfect spot with a view towards one of the fourteeners. They unrolled their sleeping bags, placed each teddy bear in their respective snuggly spot and proceeded to check out the scene around their campsite.

This is relaxing defined, she told her sister. This is adventure defined, her sister replied. They both laughed. Want to go biking, she asked?

Well, of course, sister answered, why else would that trail be there?

They put on their helmets, grabbed their adventure bags and off they went, biking along the single track.

(the end, more later)

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The Snake Next To The TypeWriter

My mind wanders as I think about about Stephen Pressfield’s book The War of Art, which describes the inner battle the writer struggles with in their creative pursuits.

I look over to where my laptop lays and to my surprise I find an anaconda, seven and half feet in length with a circumference of thirteen inches, just sitting there with her mean yellow eyes looking deeply into my soul. The green scales coiling slowly. Asystole. My heart flatlines. Poof. This is how it ends, I think.

This is the scene I imagine at the thought of sitting down to type.

But as I ignore my lizard brain the fog clears and the sun comes up. I start to type and then the words start to pour. The sunbeams shine brighter, flower petals open; even the succulents seem happier.

This is the definition of winning I think. I look next to me and see a quote by Aldous Huxley

Do what you should do when you should do it, whether you feel like it or not.

And another,

We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence then is not an act, it is a habit.

These kind words fill my soul, motivating me to seize the day.

And then I realize, I just did.

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Shipping before you’re ready (and you’re always ready)

Write, they said.

It will be fun, they said.

They must have been on drugs were right.

Writing is a fun, creative, painfully antagonizing! process, which is a reflection of thought. The ability to deliver a succinct message, create tension for a reader, hold it, and then have them breathe out with release with a change in their perspective is the result of a laborious grueling process, similar to shoveling pig slop. The final written product of what you read results from clear perfectly formed ideas having an idea, putting it down on paper, revising, and revising some more. It might appear like pig shit shiny and bright once you’re finished with it.

However, this is rare. The ability to put the alphabet in a particular order and then form a word combined with another word that makes somewhat of a haphazard sentence is easy as 1-2-3! takes daily practice, and requires showing up generously.

It is a simple act of throwing, catching, releasing, and shipping before you think you are ready.

To throw a ball well, you must first practice throwing the ball. You might shatter a neighbor’s window in the process, yet this is essential to learning. This learning process might be described as a peaceful flow of revising and editing that ebbs back and forth like a calm shoreline at dusk, as I was once told.

I couldn’t disagree more. Editing what you write is similar to stepping out on your porch in the morning to discover a hungry ravenous snapping alligator who has just eaten your dog; it must be wrestled with until either you or the alligator wins. Ah, now you can breathe.

The fact is, you are always ready. You must simply decide.

That’s all for today.

Cheers to shipping and gator soup,

Cory

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A New Transition in 2021

Life is full of different seasons. Some seasons are so dry it feels like fire. Sometimes it rains so hard if floods. And yet other times it is so bright and sunny that you need new sunglasses.

It is now Springtime in Colorado and this blog marks a fresh start in life for me: Writing. The grass isn’t any greener when you write (as opposed to not writing), but it sure does bring personal joy, clarity and a new found sense of self.

Writing is something I have talked and talked about for years.

And then I recently re-discovered something:

In order to write, you actually have to sit down and do it!

The advanced writer, with years of practice, may laugh at this statement but also may remember the daily struggle, lack of motivation or inability to hone in one on thing and simply do what needs to be done, and this is, writing.

Perhaps the war of art and creativity really never truly goes away. Five of my favorite authors have much more to say on this.

So, I admit I am a novice writer.

But here I am, writing anyway. Drop by drop, one letter at a time, I hope these life thoughts and words strung together like cheerios on a string provide a new perspective to you and yours, as they have done so for me.

Thanks for reading.

On Quitting

It took over 100 ‘No’s before someone told me Yes.

It took over 500 blog posts before I changed my thought process.

It took me over 700 days to end a relationship.

Some might say I am a slow learner.

Perhaps.

Id argue differently. Im not notoriously a slow thinker yet I strive to be like one.

There are benefits to thinking slow:

– Creating a well designed plan.

– Calculating risk.

– Physically writing down the advantages and disadvantages regarding a situation.

– Sleeping on an email before sending it.

It took Tim Ferriss 28 publisher rejections prior to being told Yes to the NYT best seller The 4 Hour Workweek. And thats after he did the work of writing it.

Shackleton’s men endured over 500 days escaping an icy death. That was after they decided to take the voyage.

It took Derek Sivers a decade of experience before he could write Anything You Want.

A team of people failed countless times before creating a working light bulb.

Sinek will ask you to Start With Why.

Seth will ask, Whats it for?

And Carse will point out playing for the long game is about playing to play, not playing to win.

Deciding to end or start something both have one commonality. You must decide. And then go do that thing.

Thanks for reading,

Cory