Write

When you are happy, Write.

When you are sad, Write.

When you are feeling confident, Write some more.

When you are unsure and stuck, Write Again.

Keep Writing and then Write some more.

Reflect on what you Wrote.

No one ever has to see it.

If you do share, do so generously.

And Write again in the morning.

Keep on Truckin’

Love, Your Future Self

The Day I Took Cheese On A Walk

I woke up and saw the outside world was beautiful.

What a pleasant day for a walk, I thought.

I did not have a pet dog, fish, or bunny. The next best option was Cheese.

I brushed my teeth, tied my shoes, and removed Cheese from the fridge.

I cut a nice chunk and put it in my pocket.

I phoned the school, impersonated mom.

“My daughter won’t be in; she’s home sick.”

They said, “Ok.”

Cheese and I took a step out the door to adventure.

We went all over creation. We walked past the school.

We walked past the library. We even walked past the disco.

We walked all the way down to the river to have a seat.

I pulled Cheese out of my pocket.

It had taken another shape.

Someone walked by.

“Can you take our picture?”

They looked at me puzzled, eyebrows slightly raised. “Smile,” they said.

“Cheese!”

“Thank you,” I said and continued down the riverwalk.

Cheese and I picked a handful of flowers and journeyed on.

We marched back up the hill to home, Cheese and flowers in my pocket.

When mom washed clothes, her eyebrows slightly raised, puzzled.

The inside world was beautiful.

I went to bed.

Inspired by Shel Silverstein; Based on Real Life Events.

Cory

Camping 2.0

… and off they went biking along the single track…

The girls had ridden their bicycles all day. They just completed an eighteen-mile out n’ back trail named Sourdough, up along Indian Creek Wilderness, a bit north of Nederland, Colorado.

What a day! she exclaimed; I’m starving.

I could eat at least three burgers, her sister replied. What do we have for food?

Marshmallows. I believe that’s all we packed. 

Well, that puts us in a pickle, said her sister.

Just kidding, Dad shipped us out with a true spread: burgers, fixings, and even chocolate cake. All we have to do is fire up the grill. 

After dinner, the sun dipped and glowed a radiant starburst orange behind the Rockies. The wind whispered gently through the trees, and the birds and bugs chattered softly.

The girls put together a small campfire to warm their toes and snuggled up right next to each other in their camp chairs, teddy bears included.

They had brought a mix of books with them in the truck to start the evening. 

To her surprise, she had found an old-looking book squeezed between some of their favorites. Look at this, she told her sister, one of dad’s booksHe must have sent it along with us…

… to be continued… 

Thanks for reading, 

Cory

Motorcycle JoyMachine

Sometimes when I wake up, I don’t feel like going to work. The sheets are warm and it is still dark outside. The blackness of sleep engulfs my brain. I think to myself I should really get a work-from-home kind of job. It is Monday afterall. The call from management with someone saying, You know what, take the day off doesn’t ever ring.

Then I remember, I’m riding my motorcycle to work. I literally spring out of bed like an activated mousetrap. I think about skipping the coffee (but I don’t) and I race out the door and ride slow because life is the journey.

Being able to hop on and ride the KLR650 turns the morning slog into an adventure. This one factor changes everything I had previously thought about the day.

The gray fog world transforms as the sun bursts pink and orange. Rising over the trees, shining bright and almost blinding my eyes from the traffic light, I accelerate and smile east into the sun. I have a 360 degree view.

As I shift from second to third, I think, riding to work is far better than driving to work (and safer if everyone did it). You are super aware of your surroundings. Your radar is sharp, defensive driving skills astute. You’re not complacent or distracted. You don’t text and drive. I am always surprised why more people don’t ride. It is okay. Drivers just don’t know how much fun they are missing out on. 

Life is undoubtedly better on a motorcycle. Riding is like being in a secret society. Passing by other riders, you give the friendly low wave, the acknowledgment nod. Cruising by you both know you have the same shared joy.

End

Thanks for reading,

Cory

4 Steps to Talk STIs with Your Kid

*This article is purely information and meant to add to your PCP recs and visit*

As a parent and soon-to-be Family Nurse Practitioner, I frequently wonder how I will handle the Sexually Transmitted Infection (previously STD) conversation with my kids.


Every parent is different and true to form, every kid is develops in their own time. The dynamics between your relationship with your kid(s) is much different from mine.

Regardless, here is a four step approach I would take to have an STI conversation with your kid:

  1. Be honest and open

Kids want to know about this kind of stuff. If you don’t start the conversation, they will and it may not be with you. Many kids look to their peer group and online as a source of information. As you could probably imagine, most of the information they will find will not be up to par. This is why it is vital for you, as the parent, to kickstart the conversation.

The best time to bring up a conversation about symptoms of Candida vulvovaginitis may not be when you are eating cottage cheese for breakfast (or it might depending upon your parenting style). In our house, many conversations do spring up during family mealtimes. The mealtime prep arena is a great way to find out about what is going in your kid’s life, what they are up to and who they hang with. 

If you don’t know, ask. And if you’re not sure, look it up from a reputable source like CDC, WHO, or MayoClinic. Ask your Primary Care Provider. Let’s say your kid asks a question you have no idea how to respond to. Try saying, “Great question, let’s look it up together.” By you saying this phrase, it shows your kid that you are transparent, a lifelong learner and shows them where and how to find information. A side effect is that your kid will be the one spinning reputable information to his or her friends.

I would use the following sites:

2. Listen, Ask Questions

As a parent, you want to keep a cool collected approach. This involves being genuinely interested in what your kid has to say and not freaking out and panicking if the sex/disease conversation springs up starting with them.

3. Encourage the HPV Vaccine

Many parents fear that encouraging kids to get this shot will encourage them to start having sex. For those of you who like data, it actually doesn’t.

Of all the vaccines, the Human Papillomavirus Vaccine is the only vaccine that can prevent six types of cancer (males and females). It is a two to three-shot series typically offered to kids starting ages nine and typically 11 – 14 up to age 26. (For the nitty-gritty, the 9-valent HPV vaccine protects against HPV types 6, 11, 16, 18, 31, 33, 45, 50, and 58.) And of course, there are always special circumstances to receiving this vaccine, so best to talk with your PCP.

4. Whoops

So say you found this article way too late. Your child is currently having sex, has or has had an STI. What do you do now? (see bullet 5)

Are they currently feeling sickly? Unless life-threatening (go to the ED), visit your PCP for treatment. Expect to pay for something along the lines of a z-pack and some doxy for a GC-type workup.

4.5 A Note on Birth Control: Males and females: many offices offer free condoms. Better to prevent than to react. For females, a popular option is an implant.

5. Keep the conversation going

Keeping the door open for continued conversation is key. An introduction to STIs during breakfast may get shut down quick with a gross factor yet it is important. Providing an open door and allowing your kid to come to you when he or she is ready promotes trust and safety.

End

Did you find this useful? Share with a friend.

Thanks for reading.

Cory

Photo Credit GiantMicrobes.com